Referendum Update: IT’S STILL THE ECONOMY

My previous assessment of the Referendum Campaign in early August was downbeat although less bleak than in June. The polls have yet to move YES-wards to any great extent but intuitively, I sense the beginnings of movement. In the street, people are now raising the issue of voting YES, asking questions rather than avoiding the topic. All quite unscientific, yet perhaps straws in the wind.

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Economic Policy Options for an Independent Scotland

This paper has been produced as a joint exercise between Options for Scotland, and the Jimmy Reid Foundation. It is designed to take a radical look at the type of economic policy options which would be open to an independent Scottish government. It does not make any assumptions about what the political stance of a post-independence Scottish government would be: but the approach is consistent with the Jimmy Reid Foundation concept of the Common Weal.

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Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom – Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom

“Sae come aa ye at hame wi freedom – Never heed whit the houdies croak for Doom”

These lines from Hamish Henderson’s anthem “Freedom Come Aa Ye” were originally penned more than half a century ago.  Sadly, Hamish left us long before the 21st century’s “houdies” – “Better Together” and the massed ranks of the British establishment – stirred in opposition to next year’s referendum on Scottish independence.  Yet, his lines could well have been written specifically with those unionist rogues in mind.

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Why Scotland Should Have Its Own Currency

In a forceful article by Jim Fairlie, former deputy leader of the SNP released today by Options for Scotland, Mr. Fairlie criticises the implicit decision of the YES Campaign to accept the option of a formal currency union with rUK when Scotland becomes independent. He points out that the strident tone of the opposition of the No Campaign and the Treasury is such that one has to wonder why Scots would find anything attractive in an continuing union with rUK.

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